2014 Benefit Dinner Invite

2014 Harvesting Justice Together Benefit Dinner

  Get RSVP Dinner Ticket Here RSVP Ticket Deadline: Thursday, August 7, 2014 Please click the green “Get RSVP Dinner Ticket Here”  link above in order to save your seat for the Harvesting Justice Together Benefit Dinner on Saturday, August 16, 2014.  *There is no fee for the dinner ticket.  The ticket is your RSVP for […]

North Carolina Kicks Off the Harvest of Dignity Campaign!

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The Farmworker Advocacy Network invites you to a Thanksgiving gathering…

The Harvest of Dignity Campaign Kick-Off!

 
 
Who: Farm workers and allies, people of faith, local media, local chefs, and you!

What: The Harvest of Dignity Campaign Kick Off

Luncheon and media event

When: Thurs., Nov. 18th, 12noon-2pm

Where: Pullen Memorial Baptist Church, Raleigh, NC

Why: To get the word out about the Harvest of Dignity Campaign – a new campaign that demands safe living conditions & working conditions for farm workers, and enforcement of current laws that protect these workers. This is our opportunity to share stories with the press & to share a Thanksgiving meal with farm workers, farm worker-allies and local media!

RSVP by Nov. 11th: We need your support and presence at this event!

Email: krausserin@gmail.com, or call: (828) 273-0927. Leave your name, organization/community affiliation, language preference (Eng./Spn.) and any food restrictions you may have.

Get involved!
NC Farmworkers need your strong support over the coming months to make much critical policy changes for safe workplaces, safe places to live and stronger enforcement of existing laws.

Endorse the campaign
Have you and/or your organization endorsed the campaign? Now, you can endorse Harvest of Dignity on the FAN website! It’s easy and takes 30 seconds… Go to: http://www.ncfan.org/organization/

Host a House Party
Contact your local NFWM staff to get you started. We’ve got party-planning guides, recipes, materials on the campaign and more! Email: nc@nfwm.org or call: 919-597-1080

Two great films on the same night! One in the Triad & One in the Triangle!

Please consider joining NFWM-NC at one of these great films!

In Durham
Harvest of Shame and Harvest of Dignity at the NC Latin American Film Festival
Tuesday Nov. 16 | 7-9 pm | UNC Global Education Center
 
 
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In Greensboro
Join NFWM NC along with the NC Council of Churches and local filmmaker Charles Thompson for an extraordinary evening in Greensboro as we premiere the new film Brother Towns / Pueblos Hermanos. Afterwards, Dr. Thompson will answer questions about the film.
Tuesday Nov. 16 | 7-9 pm | Stallings Ballroom – B, Memorial Student Union NC A&T University

Intern Blog: Church Delegation with ERUUF and NFWM

By Blake Daniel, Duke Divinity Intern

Yesterday I traveled to a remote farm in north-central North Carolina as part of the National Farm Worker Ministry’s farmworker outreach project. My fellow NFWM workers and I traveled with some ten members of the Eno River Unitarian Universalist Fellowship to pay a visit to a group of migrant Latino men who have been working in the tobacco fields all summer. Our goal in visiting was one of solidarity. Most of us from NFWM and ERUUF have spent time learning about the lives and hardships of migrant workers in the U.S. and, as such, we were eager to dialogue with and befriend members of this group that so often goes unnoticed.

We spent the better part of the afternoon in fellowship at the workers’ house, which was an aged trailer sitting in solitude amongst acres of tobacco crops. My fellow intern Lauren led us all in introductions and ice-breakers. Members of ERUUF provided a lunch replete with ham, macaroni salad, fresh fruit, and ice-cold Pepsi.

Intern Blog: A First Visit to a Labor Camp

By Blake Daniel, Duke Divinity Intern

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We pulled up to the ramshackle farmhouse in the boondocks of North Carolina just as the sun was setting. I took stock of the rural imagery as we parked and got out of the car. This sunset is beautiful, I thought – yet my thoughts quickly ran to the farm workers whom we were preparing to visit: Each sunset merely concludes a day of sweltering summer heat. And what beautiful farmland! But would I like to work this farmland on my hands and knees twelve hours a day, six days a week? Indeed, much of the bucolic setting comes at the expense of unrewarded human labor. I couldn’t help but think, How much of this soil has blood in it?

Thankfully my cascading thoughts were diverted as we padded our way onto the front porch of the house. Both curious and cautious, we knocked on the trim of the screen door and peered through the mesh. A smiling face quickly appeared and greeted us warmly in Spanish. Alex’s disposition changed immediately as she recognized Luis, a farm worker from Veracruz, Mexico with kind eyes and a gentle presence. Luis ushered us inside and introduced us to his two coworkers and housemates, who are also from Veracruz and, like Luis, are working in North Carolina as part of the government’s H2A guest worker program.

For ninety minutes, we – Alex, Lauren, and myself – sat in the front room of this old farmhouse, beneath one exposed lightbulb and amidst stifling humidity, and we told stories. Sometimes our stories were of lighter fare – our thoughts on the World Cup, for instance, or on the awkwardness of learning another language – and sometimes our stories focused on more serious issues, like immigration reform and the recent death of a farm worker friend. Since my Spanish is pretty rusty, I spent most of the time listening.

Intern Blog: Building chicken coops and bridges

By Blake Daniel, Duke Divinity Intern

blake.jpgThis past Saturday I learned how to build chicken coops.  No, not long, industrial chicken coops like you see on poultry farms; rather, chicken coops made from two-by-fours and wire, made to sit comfortably in one’s own back yard. 

I learned this as part of a service project we did in Hurdle Mills, NC, at the home of a wonderful Latino farm worker family.  Alexandria Jones, my wife Erin, and myself met up with some friends from all over central North Carolina to put our muscles to work building two chicken coops, both of which can hold at least ten chickens and provide meat and eggs for an entire family.  While working in the hot sun for several hours was very tiring, the group’s enthusiasm, humor, and desire to serve more than compensated for the hard labor.  It was a great opportunity to meet a farm worker family first-hand, to practice Spanish, and to get an inkling of an idea of what life is like for farm workers who work all day, every day, in the hot North Carolina sun.

Forfeiting the usual Saturday sleep-in, Erin and I awoke early to drive to tobacco farm country in Hurdle Mills, NC.  We showed up to the farm property, unsure of who exactly we were helping and what condition their home was in.  But, as we approached the home, we were greeted in Spanish by Francisca, a young mother of four with a patient, hospitable spirit.  She extended a warm welcome and we were promptly invited inside their doublewide trailer to watch Sponge Bob with the kids and drink 7-Up.

As we waited for the rest of our team, Erin and I warmed up our rusty Spanish conversation skills in getting to know Francisca and her kids.  Their hospitality and warmth was staggering.  Erin sat on the couch and chatted with Gilberto, the youngest son, about “Silly Bands,” while I tried to get a better handle on the family’s life by talking in the kitchen with Francisca.  Soon after, the rest of our party arrived, and we began working outside on the family’s two chicken coops.

"What did you eat for breakfast today? Do you know where your food came from?"

by Alexandria Jones, NFWM NC Staff

These questions set the stage for ERUUF’s religious education time for youth on June 6, 2010 led by staff and volunteers from the National Farm Worker Ministry. Young ERUFFians participated in two fun and informative hands-on activities to learn about the men, women and kids who’s hard work in the fields brings the fruits and vegetables to our tables each day.

In the heat of the mid-day sun, the kids participated in the “Sweet Potato Challenge” where they suited up in protective gear, dug for sweet potatoes, and raced back to their “family”. The family that was able to dig the most sweet potatoes in the shortest time was awarded the wages that farmworkers would have earned in the fields for the same work. Needless to say, the group was not impressed with their wages and most left the activity feeling decidedly better about their own allowance at home.

Then, the kids divided into “families” again and put together skits which displayed some of the joys and challenges farmworker families go through on a daily basis including waking up early to cook the day’s meals and coming home after a long day of work to wash pesticides from their clothing.

Overall, it was a great day with lots of learning and fun. Thanks ERUUF RE coordinators for inviting NFWM again this year!

EVENT: NFWM Connecting Communities Camp Outreach Training

NFWM’s Connecting Communities Project training for volunteers will be this Sunday, June 20 from 2:30-5pm at the HIVE (1214 Grove Street, Greensboro). Please RSVP if you’re able to make it.

The Connecting Communities Project’s goals are to:

  1. Locate migrant labor camps in Guilford & Forsyth Counties. (This will help FLOC organizers to identify especially unregistered camps).
  2. Talk about the Census (through the end of June); Survey for farmworkers (July – Oct.)
  3. Begin to develop relationships with those who live at the labor camps for potential delegation visits, connection to local congregations and possible participation in a human rights assessment.

The duration of the project is from June – October 15

The training will include information on the following:

  • A section on “Know-Your-Rights” for immigrants
  • How to use the Census & Survey materials
  • Project Logistics (volunteer dates, teams, and project area)
  • Country driving and the joy of locating labor camps
  • Post-visit reporting, note taking & driving directions

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Alexandria Jones
National Farm Worker Ministry NC
ajones@nfwm.org

NFWM Connecting Communities Camp Outreach Training

NFWM’s Connecting Communities Project training for volunteers will be this Sunday, June 20 from 2:30-5pm at the HIVE (1214 Grove Street, Greensboro). Please RSVP if you’re able to make it.

The Connecting Communities Project’s goals are to:

  1. Locate migrant labor camps in Guilford & Forsyth Counties. (This will help FLOC organizers to identify especially unregistered camps).
  2. Talk about the Census (through the end of June); Survey for farmworkers (July – Oct.)
  3. Begin to develop relationships with those who live at the labor camps for potential delegation visits, connection to local congregations and possible participation in a human rights assessment.

The duration of the project is from June – October 15

The training will include information on the following:

  • A section on “Know-Your-Rights” for immigrants
  • How to use the Census & Survey materials
  • Project Logistics (volunteer dates, teams, and project area)
  • Country driving and the joy of locating labor camps
  • Post-visit reporting, note taking & driving directions

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Alexandria Jones
National Farm Worker Ministry NC
ajones@nfwm.org

Intern Blog: Thoughts from Racial Justice Institute Training with Rinku Sen

by Blake Daniel, Duke Divinity Intern

Blake Daniel, Duke Divinity InternOn Wednesday the National Farm Worker Ministry North Carolina staff attended the Racial Justice Institute Training in Greensboro, NC. The training took place at the International Civil Rights Center & Museum, a stunning location that pays tribute to past and current struggles for civil rights. It was led by Rinku Sen, a leading figure in the racial justice movement.

Rinku defined racial justice as “the creation and proactive reinforcement of policies, practices, attitudes and actions that produce equitable power, access, opportunities, treatment, and outcomes for all.” The goal or indicator of racial justice is “equitable impacts and outcomes across race.” We as participants were challenged to think about the different levels of racism (internalized, interpersonal, institutional, and structural) and to brainstorm about how justice can permeate and affect each level.

Contact us

National Farm Worker Ministry
P.O. Box 10645
112 Cox Ave., Ste. 208
Raleigh, NC 27605
Email us here
919-807-8707 (office)
919-807-8708 (fax)